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SPOTLIGHT ON: Tia | 15 | Athletics | QLD

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Tia has been shining in her sport of athletics since she was three-years old. Her love of her sport has evolved over time and her focus has sharpened too. Read on to find out about Tia’s athletics adventure and what the future holds for this dedicated athlete. 

  • Name
    Tia G

  • Age
    15 years old 

  • Year at school
    Year 10

  • Sport/s:
    Athletics 

  • What is your favourite sport and why do you love it?
    Currently, I am only participating in one sport so I can fully commit to my goals within this sport. Under the athletics umbrella, I compete in the 100m and 200m sprints. However, I have also just recently started trying hurdles and implementing hurdle drills into my training sessions. I am absolutely in love with this sport as it is such a friendly community, full of likeminded athletes. I have not only learnt so much already, but I have also meet so many life long friends.

  • How did you become involved in your sport?
    When people ask me how I started Athletics, I instantly just refer back to a story from kindergarten.

    As a 3 year old in Kindi, I’m sure you can imagine that running was just an everyday activity. One day we had a race and according to my dad, I was a speedy little one. But, it wasn’t until 11 years later that I competed at my schools athletics carnival in year 9 to realise that I am in love with athletics. From that moment on, I continued to train and compete.

  • How often do you have to train and what does a typical training session involve?
    I train 4-5 times a week. A usual week consists of block starts and speed work on Monday, hurdles on Tuesday, a more technical focused session on Wednesday, and most likely endurance on Friday, followed by some more speed on Saturday usually. Our training sessions range from around 1.5 – 2 hours including warm up and cool down.

  • What is the hardest part about playing your chosen sport?
    The hardest part about sprints is the fact that all your training that you have been doing for months comes down to just 12 seconds. As daunting as it sounds, one error or lapse of focus can change your entire race.

  • Describe any challenges you’ve had to overcome to develop your skills in your chosen sport.
    I would say injuries are the main challenges in such a high intensity sport. Pushing your body to it’s limit and giving the sprint everything you got can be very detrimental on the body as you can imagine. On the daily, I get little niggles in my legs and especially hamstrings that I have to get fixed up.

  • Do you have goals you are training to achieve in your chosen sport?
    My next goal is to make it to all schools track and field nationals for the 100m sprint. At the most recent State Championships in Cairns this year, I placed 4th with a new pb; however, next year I believe that I can push myself even more to achieve my goal. Apart from this, my main goal is to always know that I am giving it my all in training and in races.

  • Who inspires you?
    My main inspiration is definitely Florence Griffith Joyner, also known as Flo-Jo. She was so humble and didn’t care what any one thought about her wacky style and long nails. Her world record for the 100m and 200m sprints has been standing for longer than 20 years. What inspires me the most about her, is that even though people became jealous and tried to taint her athletics reputation, she just kept on pushing and was resilient to every allegation against her. Although I do not get the honour to watch her in action, I will forever look back at her races and achievements.

  • What do you want to be when you’re older?
    Once I leave school, my aim is to get a high enough ATAR in order to get into medicine and continue to medical school. Although my future occupation does not involve sport, I am going to continue to train through university and hopefully represent my future university in events and competitions.

Thanks for taking part in Spotlight On, Tia!

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